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BOOKS on Modernism

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Resources by Designer

Alvar Aalto Anni and Josef Albers Marcel Breuer Joe Colombo Robin and Lucienne Day
Christopher Dresser Charles and Ray Eames Alexander Girard Eileen Gray Arne Jacobsen
Friedrich Kiesler Florence Knoll Bassett Le Corbusier Raymond Loewy Charles Rennie Mackintosh
Jasper Morrison George Nakashima George Nelson Isamu Noguchi Verner Panton
Charlotte Perriand Warren Platner Jean Prouvé Dieter Rams Jens Risom
Gilbert Rohde Jean Royère Eero Saarinen Mies van der Rohe Wilhelm Wagenfeld
Russell Wright Hans Wegner

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Newest Additions

Joe Colombo: Inventing the Future

Joe Colombo was one of the most notable and successful designers of the 1960s. in 1971 colombo died of heart failure at the height of his career. this book is the first major title on colombo in a number of years. based on an exhibition developed by the vitra design museum in conjunction with studio joe colombo in milan the end result is an exceptional work containing images and a number of excellent essays including a notable one by his assistant ignatzia favata.I remember the last title on colombo in paperback. we sold out quickly and were never able to get one for our library. get one while they last- colombo conceptually and production-wise is one of the greats.
Joe Colombo: Minimum Design

An indispensable compendium on designers to be discovered.

A wonderful atlas of objects with a rich portfolio.

In addition to being an educational instrument for students, the series will address an audience of both specialists and non-specialists, journalists or anyone wishing to collect useful information for the purpose of understanding design today

During his brief but prolific career, Cesare "Joe" Colombo became one of the most inventive figures in contemporary Italian design. His futuristic designs included 'micro-living-worlds'; multi-functional objects that aimed to save space and time and accommodate the needs of modern living spaces. These objects led to his Visiona, the 'habitat for the future' that reinvented seating, storage, lighting and other furnishings that reflected his emphasis on change and the possibilities offered by new technologies. All his items were affordably priced and designed for large-scale production and consumption, making him a major player in the evolution of the iconic 'sixties style' that is still prevalent in interior design trends today.

Published in the same style as the successful Minimum Architects series, the Minimum Designers series includes books about the major figures in the field of design, creators of objects that have become a part of our daily lives. The lamp on our desk, the chair we are sitting on, or the glasses we are wearing—all have a genius behind to be discovered.

These volumes will introduce in a practical manner the personalities and the works of the world's major designers by way of a historical-critical introduction to the work and life of each individual designer. An accurate selection of the designer's most famous objects arranged in chronological order and a critique of his or her work summarizing the most significant reviews published in magazines and newspapers will complete the subject.
Le Corbusier Le Grand

Le Corbusier Le Grand is an enormous and enormously appealing monograph on one of the greatest and most controversial visionaries of the twentieth century: Le Corbusier (1887-1965). Publisher Phaidon's super-sized volume features thousands of stunning photographs of the seminal architect, his buildings and plans, writings, and related documents (sketchbooks, personal snapshots, even postcards). With the turn of each page, readers can follow Corbusier's trajectory from revolutionary young artist and prolific writer to globe-trotting, celebrity-crusader for modern architecture and urban planning. Esteemed architectural historian and Corbusier expert Jean-Louis Cohen provides an elegant introductory essay to this veritable archive of images. We learn that although the Swiss-born Le Corbusier hailed from a small town in a small country under the modest name Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, he was destined for greatness--largely of his own design. A prime mover behind the International Style (perhaps the first truly global architectural-design language), Corbusier brought modern design principles and their promise of improved living standards to the world stage. Futuristic high rise apartment complexes, office towers, highly functional streamlined interiors and furniture made primarily of industrial materials may all be attributed in part to him and his controversial utopian mission to transform our daily lives into a highly functional and beautiful system. Le Corbusier Le Grand is an extravagant, yet essential tome for libraries, those interested in modernism, city planning, and especially those with a really big coffee table. --Lauren Nemroff
Towards a New Architecture

'The only piece of architectural writing that will be classed among the essential literature of the 20th century.'-- Reyner Banham
The City of To-mmorrow and its Planning

The great revolutionary architect's probing analysis of urban problems and their origins, and his bold solutions, which include the "Voisin" scheme for the center of Paris, and the more developed scheme for a "City of Three Million Inhabitants."
Le Corbusier: A life

From acclaimed biographer and cultural historian, author of Balthus and Patron Saints—the first full-scale life of le Corbusier, one of the most influential, admired, and maligned architects of the twentieth century, heralded is a prophet in his lifetime, revered as a god after his death.

He was a leader of the modernist movement that sought to create better living conditions and a better society through housing concepts. He predicted the city of the future with its large, white apartment buildings in parklike settings—a move away from the turn-of-the-century industrial city, which he saw as too fussy and suffocating and believed should be torn down, including most of Paris. Irascible and caustic, tender and enthusiastic, more than a mercurial innovator, Le Corbusier was considered to be the very conscience of modern architecture.

In this first biography of the man, Nicholas Fox Weber writes about Le Corbusier the precise, mathematical, practical-minded artist whose idealism—vibrant, poetic, imaginative; discipline; and sensualism were reflected in his iconic designs and pioneering theories of architecture and urban planning.

Weber writes about Le Corbusier’s training; his coming to live and work in Paris; the ties he formed with Nehru . . . Brassaï . . . Malraux (he championed Le Corbusier’s work and commissioned a major new museum for art to be built on the outskirts of Paris) . . . Einstein . . . Matisse . . . the Steins . . . Picasso . . . Walter Gropius, and others.

We see how Le Corbusier, who appreciated goverments only for the possibility of obtaining architectural commissions, was drawn to the new Soviet Union and extolled the merits of communism (he never joined the party); and in 1928, as the possible architect of a major new building, went to Moscow, where he was hailed by Trotsky and was received at the Kremlin. Le Corbusier praised the ideas of Mussolini and worked for two years under the Vichy government, hoping to oversee new construction and urbanism throughout France. Le Corbusier believed that Hitler and Vichy rule would bring about “a marvelous transformation of society,” then renounced the doomed regime and went to work for Charles de Gaulle and his provisional government.

Weber writes about Le Corbusier’s fraught relationships with women (he remained celibate until the age of twenty-four and then often went to prostitutes); about his twenty-seven-year-long marriage to a woman who had no interest in architecture and forbade it being discussed at the dinner table; about his numerous love affairs during his marriage, including his shipboard romance with the twenty-three-year-old Josephine Baker, already a legend in Paris, whom he saw as a “pure and guileless soul.” She saw him as “irresistibly funny.” “What a shame you’re an architect!” she wrote. “You’d have made such a good partner!”

A brilliant revelation of this single-minded, elusive genius, of his extraordinary achivements and the age in which he lived.
Toward an Architecture

Published in 1923, Toward an Architecture had an immediate impact on architects throughout Europe and remains a foundational text for students and professionals. Le Corbusier urges readers to cease thinking of architecture as a matter of historical styles and instead open their eyes to the modern world. Simultaneously a historian, critic, and prophet, he provocatively juxtaposes views of classical Greece and Renaissance Rome with images of airplanes, cars, and ocean liners. Le Corbusier's slogans--such as "the house is a machine for living in"--and philosophy changed how his contemporaries saw the relationship between architecture, technology, and history. This edition includes a new translation of the original text, a scholarly introduction, and background notes that illuminate the text and illustrations.
Le Modulor and Modulor 2

In the years 1942 to 1948, Le Corbusier developed a system of measurements which became known as "Modulor". Based on the Golden Section and Fibonacci numbers and also using the physical dimensions of the average human, Modulor is a sequence of measurements which Le Corbusier used to achieve harmony in his architectural compositions. Le Modulor was published in 1950 and after meeting with success, Le Corbusier went on to publish Modulor 2 in 1955. In many of Le Corbusier's most notable buildings, including the Chapel at Ronchamp and the Unité d'habitation, evidence of his Modulor system can be seen. These two volumes form an important and integral part of Le Corbusier's theoretical writings.
Le Corbusier: Complete Works in Eight Volumes

This exceptional Complete Works edition documents the enormous spectrum in the oeuvre of one of the most influential architects of the 20th Century. Published between 1929 and 1970, in close collaboration with Le Corbusier himself, and frequently reprinted ever since, the eight volumes comprise an exhaustive and singular survey of his work. Includes eight volumes in a slip case box. This boxed set will be the crown jewel in anyone's library of architecture books.
Le Corbusier: An Analysis of Form

This unique appraisal of the famous Swiss architect's major works have now been expanded to include two more buildings. The Villa Shodhan and the Pavilion Suisse round out the coverage of Le Corbusier's significant works. The author critically examines Le Corbusier's achievements helping student and professional alike to appreciate the elements of successful design. The narrative and fine illustration cover the key buildings from each of the four developmental stages of his work, making it an excellent guide for practicing architects and students.
Le Corbusier: The Art of Architecture

One of the key figures in 20th-century architecture, Le Corbusier had an impact that is still potent today. Whether admirers are making a pilgrimage to his intimate, evocative chapel at Ronchamps, or urban planners are reviling his monolithic apartment blocks as inhuman and unlivable, Le Corbu still has the power to inspire and polarize the architecture and urban-planning world. This richly illustrated monograph, based on the first major Le Corbusier retrospective in more than 20 years, presents an overview of his work, including not only architectural projects, interior design and furniture, but also paintings, textiles, sculpture, drawings, and books.

Full of new discoveries and perspectives for longtime followers of Le Corbusier's work, this book is based on a rich trove of previously unpublished material, and on the latest research. Essays by well-known Le Corbusier experts examine aspects of his work, including the relationship between sculpture and architecture, his work as an interior designer, his fascination with new media and the technical object, and his lifelong interest in Asia. A comprehensive introduction to the work and influences of the architect of the century, a title that he fully deserves. With texts by Stanislaus von Moos, Jean-Louis Cohen, Arthur Ruegg, Beatriz Colomina, Mateo Kries, and others.
Le Corbusier: Houses

Le Corbusier, is famous for proclaiming ""the house is a machine for living in"". This neat comparison of 106 of his designs for houses edited by Tadao Ando Laboratory (with model, as well as plan and side views), each house to one spread, sets Le Corbusier's experiments in perspective. Two essays discuss the theory behind his designs and what they reveal about the man himself.
Le Corbusier Talks With Students

First published in France in 1943 and translated for English-speaking readers in 1961, Le Corbusier Talks with Students presents advice and commentary from the master of modernism for young architects-to-be. In chapters ranging from "Disorder" to "The Construction of Dwellings" to "A Research Workshop," Le Corbusier discusses his views on architectural history and offers opinions on the future of the profession, while touching on his own projects for the Villa Savoye, the Cit Universitaire, and the Radiant City. Topics such as architecture's role in our directionless society; the balance between spiritual values and technical factors; and the importance of space, proportion, and color are explored by this renowned architect, and still resonate today, almost 50 years later.
Hans J. Wegner's 100 Chairs

This beautiful little book is known to be the most comprehensive collection of Hans Wegners work. Published only in Japan, most of the text is in Japanese, and, as all Japanese books are, is organized from back to front. A must have resource for the serious Wegner scholar.
Constructive Furniture

In the fields of design, architecture, and engineering, Jean Prouvé (1901–1984) is widely considered one of the most versatile and innovative designers of the 20th century. Yet surprisingly, only a relatively small number of collectors and cognoscente outside France are familiar with his work. Alongside Charles and Ray Eames, to whose oeuvre Vitra has dedicated itself since 1957, Jean Prouvé can truly be considered the second major ”constructor” in 20th century design. The small book delves into the manifest differences between the Eames' work and Prouvé's designs – differences that are quite evidently the product of the respective technological climate in which these marvelous designers were active. For many years now, the Vitra Design Museum collection has focused on Jean Prouvé as well as Charles and Ray Eames.
Taschen Basic Architecture Series
Case Study Houses (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

The Case Study House program (1945-1966) was an exceptional, innovative event in the history of American architecture and remains to this day unique. The program, which concentrated on the Los Angeles area and oversaw the design of 36 prototype homes, sought to make available plans for modern residences that could be easily and cheaply constructed during the postwar building boom. Highly experimental, the program generated houses that were designed to redefine the modern home, and thus had a pronounced influence on architecture - American and international - both during the program's existence and even to this day. This compact guide includes all projects featured in our XL version, with over 150 photos and plans and a map of where all houses are (or were) located.
Breuer (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

From steel tubes to reinforced concrete: the magical Modernist In 1956, Time magazine called him one of the 'form-givers of the 20th century': with his invention of steel-tube furniture, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981) has made his mark in the history of design at the tender age of 23. He started his architectural career as one of the Bauhaus's most influential architects with the 1932 Harnischmacher House. Even Breuer's earliest work was marked by the search for a symbiosis between local and global, big and small, smooth and rough. His sparse use of materials emphasized the balance among textures, colors, and shapes. In 1943, he conceived the 'binuclear' house concept-the splitting of living and sleeping areas into separate wings-which he first applied to the Geller House I (1944-1946), and which would attain great popularity. After designing the UNESCO headquarters in Paris (1953-1958), reinforced concrete, with its formal plasticity und structural elasticity, continued to give monumental character to buildings such as the Abbey and Campus of St. John's University in Minnesota (1953-1961), the IBM Research Center in France (1960-1962), and the Whitney Museum of American Art (1963-1966) in New York City. With his keen sense of proportion, shape, and material, Breuer is one of the most important Modernists and is still very much central in the discussion of contemporary architecture.
Kahn (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Though Louis Isidore Kahn (1901-1974) started his career late in his life, the few projects he was able to undertake were realized to perfection. With the Jonas Salk Institute in La Jolla, California (1959-1965) Kahn created a workspace with superb functional and aesthetic qualities; the institute's Minimalist elements radiate a sense of eternal beauty. The Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth (1966-1972) occupies the somewhat faceless city like an island of spiritual space, an effect that is achieved by simplicity in design and materials. Also, the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad (1962-1974) and the Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, National Assembly of Bangladesh in Dhaka that was finished after his death are buildings of monumental importance, demonstrating the vision of a talented and very unusual man. This book brings together 17 Kahn projects, ranging from private housing to commercial architecture, religious buildings, exhibition spaces, and government buildings.
Mies van der Rohe (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Less is more: finding perfection in purity Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886?1969) was one of the founding fathers of modern architecture. The creator of the Barcelona Pavilion (1929), the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois (1945?1951) and the Seagram Building in New York (1954?1958), Mies was one of the founders of a new architectural style. Well known for his motto ?less is more, ? he sought a kind of refined purity in architectural expression that was not seen in the reduced vocabulary of other Bauhaus members. His goal was not simply building for those of modest income (Existenzminimum) but building economically in terms of sustainability, both in a technical and aesthetical way; the use of industrial materials such as steel and glass were the foundation of this approach. Though the extreme reduction of form and material in his work garnered some criticism, over the years many have tried?mostly unsuccessfully?to copy his original and elegant style. This book explores more than 20 of his projects between 1906 and 1967, from his early work around Berlin to his most important American buildings. Basic Architecture features: ? Each title contains approximately 120 images, including photographs, sketches, drawings, and floor plans ? Introductory essays explore the architect's life and work, touching on family and background as well as collaborations with other architects ? The body presents the most important works in chronological order, with descriptions of client and/or architect wishes, construction problems (why some projects were never executed), and resolutions ? The appendix includes a list of complete or selected works, biography, bibliography and a map indicating the locations ofthe architect's most famous buildings.
Hoffman (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

The avant-gardist The influence of the Austrian architect and designer Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956) is extraordinary: for a period of over 60 years he kept up an aesthetic dialog with Modernism, the International Style, and Art Deco. Before being rediscovered in the 1980s by the Post-Modernists, his work was nearly forgotten; now his importance is unquestioned. As a designer he was one of the leading proponents of the Wiener Werkst?tte, with its close connection to the Arts and Crafts movement. As an architect, he built the first modern buildings in Europe, such as the Purkersdorf Sanatorium (1904) and the Palais Stoclet (1905-1911). Traversing several styles and schools during his lifetime, his work shows a consistent Formalism. He abandoned Functionalism long before it became obsolete. In a historic sense, Hoffmann was doubly avant-garde: in both the rise and fall of Modernism.
Bauhaus (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Functional beauty Founded in Welmar in 1919, the Bauhaus school developed a revolutionary approach that fused fine art with craftsmanship and engineering in everything from architecture to furniture, typography, and even theater. Originally headed by Walter Gropius, the Bauhaus counted among its members artists and architects such as Paul Klee, Lyonel Feininger, Wassily Kandinsky, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and Marcel Breuer. In 1930 Ludwig Mies van der Rohe took over as the leader, but soon after, in 1933, the Nazi government shut down the school. During its fourteen years of existence, Bauhaus managed to change the faces of art, architecture, and industrial design forever and is still hugely influential today.
Scharoun (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

German architect Hans Scharoun (1893-1972) studied and practiced architecture his entire adult life but did not build a major building until 1963 when his impressive Berlin Philharmonie finally came to life. Scharoun's sculptural designs were influenced by the Expressionist and Kubst und Werk circles in which he mingled, but his dramatic designs were highly singular and among the best of his generation.
Eames (Tashcen Basic Architecture Series)

Nothing says modernist perfection like an Eames design. Though they are best known to the general public for their furniture, the husband and wife duo of Charles and Ray Eames (1907-78 and 1912-88, respectively) were also forerunners in the fields of architecture, industrial design, photography, and film. This book covers all the aspects of their illustrious career, from the earliest furniture experiments and molded plywood designs to the Case Study Houses to their work for Herman Miller and films such as the seminal short, "Powers of Ten".
Wright (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Widely thought to be the greatest American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) was a true pioneer, both artistically and technically. At a time when reinforced concrete and steel were considered industrial building materials, Wright boldly made use of them to build private homes. His prairie house concept--that of a low, sprawling home based upon a simple L or T figure--was the driving force behind some of his most famous houses and became a model for rural architecture across America. Wright's designs for office and public buildings were equally groundbreaking and unique. From Fallingwater to New York's Guggenheim Museum, his works are among the most famous in the history of architecture.
Le Corbusier (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Architectural poetry in the machine age Born Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, Le Corbusier (1887-1965) adopted his famous pseudonym after publishing his ideas in the review L'Esprit Nouveau in 1920. The few buildings he was able to design during the 1920s, when he also spent much of his time painting and writing, brought him to the forefront of modern architecture, though it wasn't until after World War II that his epoch-making buildings were constructed, such as the Uniti d'Habitation in Marseilles and the Church of Notre Dame du Haut in Ronchamp. Basic Architecture features: Each title contains approximately 120 images, including photographs, sketches, drawings, and floor plans Introductory essays explore the architect's life and work, touching on family and background as well as collaborations with other architects The body presents the most important works in chronological order, with descriptions of client and/or architect wishes, construction problems, and resolutions.
Koenig (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

A leading proponent of the Case Study House program. There are few images of 20th century architecture more iconic than the nighttime view of Case Study House #22 set on its eagle's-nest site high above the lights of Los Angeles. With his two innovative houses for the famous project of the Arts and Architecture magazine, American architect Pierre Koenig (1925-2004) became one of the leading figures of the Modern movement in America. While still a student of architecture, he designed and built his first exposed steel house in 1950, proving that the use of prefabricated materials could allow for spatial freedom in affordable houses. Koenig's houses, like the Johnson House (1962) or the Oberman House (1962), are a direct response to Southern California's extremely warm and dry climate. His work is deeply marked by his commitment to environmentally and socially responsible design. His houses have thus become characteristic of the spirit of a whole generation: they perfectly capture the excitement and optimism of the American postwar society.
Aalto (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Finnish architect Alvar Aalto (18981976) was not only influenced by the landscape of his native country, but by the political struggle over Finland's place within European culture. Aalto turned to ideas based on Functionalism, subsequently moving toward more organic structures, with brick and wood replacing plaster and steel. He also designed buildings, furniture, lamps, and glass objects. Contains approximately 120 images, including photographs, sketches, drawings, and floor plans Introductory essays explore the architect's life and work, touching on family and background as well as collaborations with other architects The body presents the most important works in chronological order, with descriptions of client and/or architect wishes, construction problems and resolutions The appendix includes a list of complete or selected works, biography, bibliography and a map indicating the locations of the architect's most famous buildings.
Neutra (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

The quintessential California Modernist "The continual refinement of human knowledge of the body and soul came to be one and the same thing for me, and the architecture of human living space its most necessary application and valuation." - Richard Neutra Born and raised in Vienna, Richard Neutra (1872-1970) came to America early in his career, settling in California. His influence on post-war architecture is undisputed, the sunny climate and rich landscape being particularly suited to his cool, sleek modern style. Neutra had a keen appreciation for the relationship between people and nature; his trademark plate glass walls and ceilings which turn into deep overhangs have the effect of connecting the indoors with the outdoors. Neutra's ability to incorporate technology, aesthetics, science, and nature into his designs him recognition as one of Modernist architecture's greatest talents.
Frey (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

In 1930, when Albert Frey (1903-1998) came to the US from his native Switzerland, he brought the influence of his mentor, Le Corbusier, with him. The innovative Aluminaire House that he developed together with A. L. Kocher was exhibited in 1932 by Henry-Russell Hitchcock and Philip Johnson in the legendary show in the Museum of Modern Art in New York "The International Style: Architecture since 1922" as one of the very few American examples of the movement. Soon after, Frey discovered the California desert, where he would settle and complete his most substantial works. Throughout his life, Frey was interested in finding new ways of building, as well as working with and doing research on prefabricated materials, the results of which he regularly published. With visionary talent, Frey built elegant, clearly structured residential houses and was the founder of the "desert modernism" style.Every book in "Taschen's Basic Architecture Series" features: approximately 120 images, including photographs, sketches, drawings, and floor plans; introductory essays exploring the architect's life and work, touching on family and background as well as collaborations with other architects; the most important works presented in chronological order, with descriptions of client and/or architect wishes as well as construction problems and resolutions; and, an appendix including a list of complete or selected works, biography, bibliography and a map indicating the locations of the architect's most famous buildings.
Gropius (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Born and educated in Germany, Walter Gropius (1883-1969) belongs to the select group of architects that massively influenced the international development of modern architecture. As the founding director of the Bauhaus, Gropius made inestimable contributions to his field, to the point that knowing his work is crucial to understanding Modernism. His early buildings, such Fagus Boot-Last Factory and the Bauhaus Building in Dessau, with their use of glass and industrial features, are still indispensable points of reference. After his emigration to the United States, he influenced the education of architects there and became, along with Mies van der Rohe, a leading proponent of the International Style.
Schindler (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Rudolf M. Schindler, a Viennese-born architect who studied with Adolf Loos and worked for Frank Lloyd Wright, is known for his contribution to the California modernist style in residential design. Though he was little recognized in life, his reputation was rescued by Esther McCoy in Five California Architects (1987. 2d ed.) and David Gebhard in the seminal Schindler (William Stout, 1997. 3d ed.). Steele's brief essay on the life and work of SchindlerApresented here alongside a collection of platesApales in comparison to these works. The only meritorious aspect of this "coffee-table Schindler" is the fine photography. Over 160 illustrations, in color and black and white, provide an excellent visual presentation of the architect's work, second only to that found in RM Schindler, edited by Lionel March and Judith Sheine (Academy Eds., 1995). Recommended for comprehensive architectural collections. - A Jay Schafer
Lautner (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

American architect, John Lautner (1911-1994) is responsible for some of the most original buildings of the space age and, indeed, the 20th century. The residences he designed in the Los Angeles area, including the Chemosphere House and the Silvertop, are synonymous with the hopes and dreams of an entire era. Characterized by sweeping rooflines, glass-paneled walls, and steel beams, his buildings displayed a combination of fantasy and minimalism, often integrating water and incorporating surrounding landscapes. Lautner always placed great importance on the relationship between humans, space, and nature.
Saarinen (Taschen Basic Architecture Series)

Eero Saarinen (1910-1961) was one of the 20th century's great visionaries, both in the fields of furniture design (he created the ubiquitous Knoll "Tulip" chairs and tables, for example) and in architecture. Among his greatest accomplishments are monuments that shaped architecture in postwar America and became icons in themselves: Washington D.C.'s Dulles International Airport, the very sculptural and fluid TWA terminal at JFK Airport in New York, and the 630-foot high "Gateway to the West," the Arch of St. Louis. Marrying curves and dynamic forms with a modernist aesthetic, he brought a whole new dimension to architecture.


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